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Image of Professor Bradley Reed Presenting

The AAPI Advancement Award

The AAPI Advancement Award was created in 2022 to honor current UVA faculty members who have made significant contributions towards greater understanding and appreciation of Asian culture or Asian-American relations. The annual award recipient is chosen by alumni through an online nomination and voting process. The winning faculty member is awarded a Jefferson Cup and $5,000 to donate to their UVA department of choice. The award ceremony takes place as part of AAPAAN Celebration in Spring, and the presentation of the award is accompanied by a short series of faculty TED talks.

2023 AAPI Advancement Award Recipient: Professor Bradly Reed

Corcoran Department of History

Headshot of Professor Bradley ReedProfessor Bradly Reed is an Associate Professor of History at UVA. Students who took his “Modern China” course described him as an “incredibly engaging,” “intensely knowledgeable,” and “inspiring” teacher. Former students also praised his passion for the subject that “permeates every lecture” and pushes them to care as well. His teaching and research focus on Late Imperial and Modern China, and his main specialties include Late Imperial Law and Society, Local Government and Administrative Practice, and Cultural Revolution Studies. His book Talons and Teeth, County Clerks and Runners in the Qing Dynasty has been lauded as a valuable contribution to the study of a sophisticated bureaucracy in a non-Western, nonmodern setting. He is currently researching the influence of bureaucratic administration on the judicial process during the Qing era.

2022 AAPI Advancement Award Recipient: Professor Shu-Chen Chen

Department of East Asian Languages, Literatures and Cultures

Professor Shu-Chen Chen has been teaching Chinese at UVA since 2005. She is currently an Associate Professor of Chinese. A native of Taiwan and a double Hoo, she has had extensive involvement in Chinese language instruction, serving as Director of the Chinese Summer Language Institute, as well as offering innovative courses like Professional Chinese with Community Engagement and Chinese Calligraphy. Her courses allow Chinese language students to connect with the broader University community through their interdisciplinary interests. In addition, following the zeitgeist of Jefferson’s Academical Village, she has been an active participant in events hosted by the Institute of World Languages and the Lorna Sundberg International Center, where she has encouraged students and colleagues, especially those not studying Chinese, to learn more about Chinese language, history, and culture. She is beloved and respected by her students both for her teaching and for her countless contributions to the University community.